About EMC Backup

EMCBackup is made up of a team of highly experienced EMC Backup Recovery Systems’ product and technical marketing managers. With decades of product and market experience among them, the team brings a rich and diverse skill set to the EMC backup and recovery portfolio and to the market. The team is responsible for the messaging and positioning of EMC’s Avamar, Data Domain, NetWorker, and Data Protection Advisor.

Where Does Archiving Rank On Your List of Critical IT Applications?

EMC Backup
EMCBackup is made up of a team of highly experienced EMC Backup Recovery Systems’ product and technical marketing managers. With decades of product and market experience among them, the team brings a rich and diverse skill set to the EMC backup and recovery portfolio and to the market. The team is responsible for the messaging and positioning of EMC’s Avamar, Data Domain, NetWorker, and Data Protection Advisor.

By Bob Spurzem, Senior Product Marketing Manager, EMC Backup Recovery Systems

Not a year goes by that a major scandal involving email does not rock the worldwide news.  And 2012 is no exception.

Recall the major story that broke the week of the United States Presidential elections involving General David Petraeus, General John Allen and a civilian Jill Kelley.  Can you believe that this scandal involved 20,000 to 30,000 documents, mostly emails that spanned a two year period beginning in 2010?

Scandals involving email are not isolated to government scandals.

Take for example the high profile patent law suit between Apple and Samsung.  When the case concluded in July 2012, it was revealed that an email from Google to Samsung had much to do with the final outcome.

National security, loss of intellectual property and general leaks of confidential information are a constant threat to organizations of all sizes, public or private.

Which brings us back to our original question:  Where does archiving stand on your IT priority list?

That answer likely depends on whether your organization has had to face a major security breach or law suit involving email, documents or similar forms of electronic information.

Archiving is the application responsible for managing sensitive information.  Archiving collects and preserves electronic information allowing for fast search and retrieval of electronic records as required by government, a court of law or an internal investigation.

Organizations that maintain an archive repository are able to manage and preserve sensitive information according to organization policy and avoid the risk of losing control of sensitive information that rests in the hands of end users.

If you don’t have a strategy for archiving, you need one!  To learn more about archiving,  managing sensitive email and other forms of electronic information, go to http://www.emc.com/archiving/ .

Some Myths About Archiving and eDiscovery

EMC Backup
EMCBackup is made up of a team of highly experienced EMC Backup Recovery Systems’ product and technical marketing managers. With decades of product and market experience among them, the team brings a rich and diverse skill set to the EMC backup and recovery portfolio and to the market. The team is responsible for the messaging and positioning of EMC’s Avamar, Data Domain, NetWorker, and Data Protection Advisor.

Guest Post by James D. Shook, Esq., eDiscovery and Compliance Practice Director, EMC Backup Recovery Systems

Organizations attempting to create and implement sound information governance programs have learned that a successful program requires skills and participation from different teams.  Unfortunately, two of the key teams – legal and IT – often clash and are misunderstood by the others.  With the hope of developing stronger information governance programs, here are two common issues created by the IT v. Legal gap.

1. Backups are not Archives

Many organizations are required by law or regulation to save certain types of information for a long period – most commonly in the range of two to five years.  Years ago, most of this information was mostly in paper, and shipping boxes offsite for long-term storage largely took care of the requirement.

But in the electronic world, a backup is not a functional archive, and using a backup in this manner can create significant costs and risks.  While the targeted data may be technically preserved, it’s extremely difficult and expensive to actually locate if a regulator actually asks for the information.  Grouping all of this information into large backup “buckets” also requires that short-term data (one or two years) is kept for the longest retention period (often 7 years or more), since it cannot be separated.  And keeping all of this data may create enormous cost and risk in an eDiscovery process.

For a better process:

  •  Treat your backup and archives as different repositories, for different uses.  If possible, backup media should be retained for a short period – think operations, not archive – and quickly reused.
  • Implement an email archive  and consider file system and Sharepoint archives to ensure that policies are being followed and data is being retained for appropriate periods.  If you also have detailed records management (RM) requirements, consider an RM solution for key records.

2. Confusion Over Aspirational Policies versus Operational Reality

Many companies have published retention and email policies that are not (and perhaps cannot) be followed in the real world.  The most common example is with the retention of email.  Let’s say that an organization has a policy stating that email is only retained for 90 days.  Legal includes this stance in corporate policies and relies upon it for eDiscovery.  IT may have “implemented” the policy by removing email older than 90 days from the email server.  Is this enough?

Everyone in IT knows that email can be stored on the email server; in an archive; or in a PST / NSF that can be located on a desktop, laptop, fileshare, DVD, etc.  In companies that permit users to move email from the server to PSTs and NSFs, this policy is meaningless – and Legal’s unknowing reliance upon the policy, when years of email can be maintained locally by users – is potentially sanctionable.

For a better process:

  • IT must carefully communicate to Legal how email is stored and retained within the organization.  PSTs may be an operational necessity if an archive is not in place, but IT needs to explain the implications of this position to the Legal department.
  •  PST / NSF caches should be eliminated in almost any organization.  While there have always been operational benefits, for almost any organization they are now significantly outweighed by legal, compliance, privacy and security concerns.

Even the best-meaning IT and Legal departments can create issues for each other in compliance and eDiscovery if they fail to properly communicate their requirements and strategies.  Putting these two groups together – along with representatives from the business and other key areas such as records management and compliance – will not only lessen risk but also save money.

Archiving: Aim Your Search to Hit the Target

EMC Backup
EMCBackup is made up of a team of highly experienced EMC Backup Recovery Systems’ product and technical marketing managers. With decades of product and market experience among them, the team brings a rich and diverse skill set to the EMC backup and recovery portfolio and to the market. The team is responsible for the messaging and positioning of EMC’s Avamar, Data Domain, NetWorker, and Data Protection Advisor.

Guest Post by Michael R. Brown, Senior Product Marketing Manager, EMC Backup Recovery Systems

Now, where was I……?  Oh yes, I was listing the many benefits of archiving email  when I got yanked off stage!  Hmmm, where did I leave off……?  Ah yes…IT and one of the many benefits….

  1. Reduces IT call centre traffic.  How many times in a month does IT receive a call to increase quotas or retrieve deleted email?  As I said in my previous point, quotas become a thing of the past with SourceOne, so no calls there.  And given that the email is in the archive and the archive is on line, the user can use the SourceOne search client to find that email that may no longer be in his or her mailbox — we call this “self-service.”
  2. Reduce number of objects in the mail servers.  Having an archive also allows organizations to eventually delete email off of the server.  Why?  Because it is in the archive and the archive is online, so the user can use the SourceOne search client to find the email (I am repeating myself!).  This deletion functionality and short-cutting provides email administrators with a dynamic duo for proactively managing mailbox sizes and keeping mail servers performing optimally.  This of course all results in costs savings.
  3. Compliance.  Once a word only used in the US corporate world, now is a concern almost everywhere.  I travel all over Europe, the Middle East and Africa talking to customers, EMC field personnel, and EMC partners.  This is a growing concern across all geographies.  This doesn’t have to be external regulatory body mandates; there is just as much internal compliance as there is external.  With regard to email, this compliance usually stipulates how long email must be retained and for which personnel it must be retained.  Having an archive allows organizations to adhere to such edicts.
  4. eDiscovery.  A term that immediately screams “United States!” and one that also conjures up images of teams of lawyers and interns coming into an organization commandeering an IT data centre and scanning dozens, if not hundreds, of laptops, file shares, and backup tapes for evidence (the silver bullet) in some white collar crime.  It can become this to some degree, but it can also be a bit less dramatic.  However, it most usually the case when the organization is asked to turn over data for certain individuals for a certain date range.  This data is then legally reviewed to determine if the information is pertinent to the legal case or matter that is being investigated.  How does an organization efficiently find and gather all this information?  What if it involves 50 individuals for a 4-year period?  Are they going to scan dozens and dozens of PST files as well as all the mailboxes?  An archive can make this much, much easier, as all the data is one place.

And there are more benefits than this.  But this should give you more than enough to get the wheels spinning and wondering how fast you can get EMC SourceOne into your organization to start reaping the benefits of implementing a proper archive!

Archiving: Bringing Chaos to Order

EMC Backup
EMCBackup is made up of a team of highly experienced EMC Backup Recovery Systems’ product and technical marketing managers. With decades of product and market experience among them, the team brings a rich and diverse skill set to the EMC backup and recovery portfolio and to the market. The team is responsible for the messaging and positioning of EMC’s Avamar, Data Domain, NetWorker, and Data Protection Advisor.

By Michael R. Brown, EMEA Pre-Sales Manager, EMC Backup Recovery Systems Division

As promised in my last blog, this entry is dedicated to beginning to detail some of the benefits of archiving email with EMC SourceOne.  In case you missed it, here  is the previous entry:

Benefits of archiving email:

1. Reduces storage requirements on your mail server.  Mailboxes are typically stored on what we call tier 1 storage — your most expensive disk — whilst the archive is typically on slower, much less expensive disk.  How does this work?  Well, when EMC SourceOne archives a message, it can also stub or shortcut the body and/or the attachments.  It physically removes the attachment and replaces it with a pointer if you will, to where the content resides in the archive.  So, that email with a 4.7 MB presentation attached to it suddenly becomes 7k in size!  Instead of that 4.7 MB sitting in your mailbox on tier 1 storage, it is sitting in the archive on storage that is 25% or less the cost.  And, the user experience remains intact.

2. Reduces overall storage requirements for your email.  SourceOne single instances email across the entire enterprise as well as compresses content — up to ~50% in the archive — the amount of overall storage required is dramatically reduced.  Take a look at an installation of a customer using SourceOne:

Number of mailboxes: 30,000

  • Average 50 emails a day per user
  • 25% contain attachments with the average size of an attachment being 400k — weighted average of email – 96k
  • Duplication rate: 30% (number of duplicate emails)
  • Deletion rate: 10%

Before implementing SourceOne

  • ~32 TB of email in their mailboxes per annum — all on most expensive storage

After implementing SourceOne

  • Total storage including mail server, SourceOne archive and SourceOne indexes: ~13.6 TB per annum

Only .6 TB now residing on mail servers! 

3. Eliminates the need for mailbox quotas.  As stated before, EMC SourceOne can shortcut or stub content within the mailbox.  This allows organizations to do away with mailbox quotas — as they will never be reached; that is of course they are set at something that is extremely small. 

4. PST Elimination.  We all know the pain that comes with PSTs.  There are lots of them and they are everywhere.  Further, there is very little or no control on where the data might travel to.  And, in the case of having to actually find information, it is difficult to scan PST files.  SourceOne cannot only find your PST files, it can archive and shortcut all the content and eliminate the PST.  It does this AND gives the user the experience of still having a PST file.

And there is more!  But wait…they are closing the curtain… I have to go!  Come back next time where I will finish my list.

Archiving: Shining a Light through the Dark Email Abyss

EMC Backup
EMCBackup is made up of a team of highly experienced EMC Backup Recovery Systems’ product and technical marketing managers. With decades of product and market experience among them, the team brings a rich and diverse skill set to the EMC backup and recovery portfolio and to the market. The team is responsible for the messaging and positioning of EMC’s Avamar, Data Domain, NetWorker, and Data Protection Advisor.

By Michael R. Brown, EMEA Pre-Sales Manager, EMC Backup Recovery Systems Division

Ever wonder what is meant when people speak of “real archiving”?  What is that exactly?  Simply put, it is using policies and rules to determine what content should get kept — archived — where it should be stored and for how long.  A proper archive is also online and enables users to get to the content through some intelligent search mechanism.  This differs dramatically from just putting content away on some box.  This “box” also might be on line, but lacks any intelligence to what should be kept; in most cases, everything is kept and most likely much longer than need be.  There is no intelligence behind what is stored; the latter isn’t really archiving, it is long-term retention.  Don’t get me wrong, long-term retention is good and very necessary, but it isn’t an archive.

Applying intelligence and having rules to discern what is worth archiving and what is not, is especially important for email.  For all the talk about email not being fast enough for today’s business and that mediums like chat, twitter, and SMS are replacing it, there is no such substantiating evidence — just ask your favorite mail administrator.  Email is and will be the main business communication vehicle for some time to come.  The sheer magnitude of email demands archiving as means by which to maintain mail server health and performance, cost control and SLAs to end user communities.  Further, if compliance and eDiscovery are issues, consider this: in most cases 85% of the content relevant in an eDiscovery case comes from email!  How does an organization efficiently execute eDiscovery without an archive?  All that said, what are the benefits of archiving email and how does one go about defining and setting the date retention policies determining what gets archived?

Over the next couple of weeks, I will detail some major benefits of archiving email with EMC SourceOne. Stay Tuned!