What’s Better? Fast VNX or Fast and Protected VNX?

Guy Churchward

Guy Churchward

President, Data Protection and Availability Division
I'm an enterprise infrastructure hack. Really, if you think of my career as a building, I’ve spent it underneath in the sewer lines and the electric plumbing, making sure things work. Invariably, my businesses end up being called boring. But that’s okay. It means they’re doing exactly what they’re supposed to do, which means their customers can do what they need to do. I come to EMC by way of BEA Systems, NetApp and most recently LogLogic, and my mission is to lead EMC Data Protection and Availability Division's efforts to deliver a protection storage architecture that leaves us all in better shape for the next guy, or gig, that comes along. Oh, and make no mistake about it, I want everyone to know who’s number one in backup, and why.

landing-promo-speed2lead

When I think about the new VNX systems with statistics that tingle the senses and lead the market, I can’t help but draw parallels to Formula One performance racing. It really gets my gear-head juices flowing.

It makes me think about the documentary “Madness on Wheels,” which tells the story of the Class B rally craze in the 1980s. I literally fell in love with the Audi Quattro the instant I saw it bouncing and sliding around the dirt track; the thrill and adrenaline was intoxicating. My love for cars was born.

In the documentary, former Finnish rally driver Juha Kankkunen describes the thirst for more power and massive leaps speed that made the rally courses a hell ride for both drivers and spectators. In 1986, a serious spectator crash at the Rally Portugal and the death of Henri Toivonen at the Tour de Corse led to the end of the racing series. So while performance is unquestionably key, it’s not everything.

Take the Bugatti Veyron. The focus is on its eye-popping top speed of 253 mph and its 0 to 60 time of 2.45 sec. Or the Porsche 991. What’s got us all talking is the impressive .02 seconds it takes to change gears with its PDK gearbox.What doesn’t get as much play is the massive advancement put into safety. Think about this: The Veyron at top speed travels one and a quarter football fields every second and would take you a quarter of a kilometer to arrest from the top speed.

The fact is stuff happens and in motors sports there will always be accidents. The same goes for any sport. Take bikes. There two types of bikers: ones who have fallen off and ones who will fall off.

Formula One is no exception where a fantastic car without a fantastic driver won’t get the job done. Similarly, a fantastic car without fantastic safety precautions won’t protect the car—and importantly—the driver when the inevitable happens. Just look at some of the safety enhancements the Formula One governing body has phased in over the years:

1950s Brakes

1960s Rollover bars, double fire extinguishers

1970s Cockpit redesign for 5-second rescue, headrests and rear headlights, driver medical tests, fireproof clothing

1980s Repositioned fuel tank behind engine and driver, crash tests

1990s Detachable steering wheels, head protection material density increased 4 times, lateral crash tests introduced

2000  Higher impact speeds for crash tests

2002  Larger rear light size

2005  Stricter driver helmet standards

2006  Higher (still) impacts speeds for crash tests

2010  Double diffusers prohibited (to reduce speed of cars)

2010  Rearview mirror placement (for maximum visibility)

2010  Zylon strip on helmet (to reinforce weakest points)

This list isn’t exhaustive but it does illustrate a couple of things:

  • Driver safety is a major concern.
  • The faster the cars go, the more attention the sport gets and the greater the focus on safety.

Now, let’s assume VNX is the car and the driver is the data. You’re going to need a robust data protection strategy to ensure business continuity, data integrity and the ability to restore “when” the unmentionable happens:

  • Hardened helmet: try a PBBA; better still use THE PBBA: Data Domain
  • Flexible cockpit: “in place” shelf upgrades
  • Advanced rearview mirrors and tail lights: the Data Protection Suite
  • Fire-retardant suits and pit crew: seamless data replication
  • Multi-function steering: integration with NDMP, Boost, snapshot management
  • Impact testing: Data Invulnerability architecture

And, yes, I could keep going… but you get the idea.

So, this is why the VNX got my blogger juices flowing, why I am super excited about the new VNX and why I’m even more excited about VNX + EMC Backup. We’re the Yin to the EMC and VNX Yang.

Be safe out there!

Guy Churchward

Guy Churchward

President, Data Protection and Availability Division
I'm an enterprise infrastructure hack. Really, if you think of my career as a building, I’ve spent it underneath in the sewer lines and the electric plumbing, making sure things work. Invariably, my businesses end up being called boring. But that’s okay. It means they’re doing exactly what they’re supposed to do, which means their customers can do what they need to do. I come to EMC by way of BEA Systems, NetApp and most recently LogLogic, and my mission is to lead EMC Data Protection and Availability Division's efforts to deliver a protection storage architecture that leaves us all in better shape for the next guy, or gig, that comes along. Oh, and make no mistake about it, I want everyone to know who’s number one in backup, and why.
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About Guy Churchward

I'm an enterprise infrastructure hack. Really, if you think of my career as a building, I’ve spent it underneath in the sewer lines and the electric plumbing, making sure things work. Invariably, my businesses end up being called boring. But that’s okay. It means they’re doing exactly what they’re supposed to do, which means their customers can do what they need to do. I come to EMC by way of BEA Systems, NetApp and most recently LogLogic, and my mission is to lead EMC Data Protection and Availability Division's efforts to deliver a protection storage architecture that leaves us all in better shape for the next guy, or gig, that comes along. Oh, and make no mistake about it, I want everyone to know who’s number one in backup, and why.

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