Five Must-Knows about Transformation and VMware

Heidi Biggar

Heidi Biggar

Marketing and IT Consultant, Data Protection and Availability Division
I’m often asked how a political science major at Tufts wound up in the IT world, covering backup, storage, virtualization and cloud of all things. Truth is, it’s really a love for learning, a need to understand the “bigger picture” and a desire to share that view with others that’s steered my path over the past 20 years, from campaign manager to editor, analyst and marketer. After hours, you’ll find me hanging with family, running 10ks through Peachtree City’s 90 miles of cart paths, watching football or reading. I’m a New England transplant enjoying life in the South. In my previous life, I also blogged for ComputerWorld, Enterprise Strategy Group and Hitachi Data Systems, but The Backup Window is my baby. It's been great watching it evolve.

157823893

Research shows that backup is going to be an increasing part of business decisions and IT spend going forward. More than that, it shows that VMware and backup spend are highly linked.

So, as 22-some-thousand of you prepare to descend on the Moscone Center next week, ready to defy convention, take a few minutes to think about the link between backup transformation and VMware… how the decisions you make to take will affect your business over the long term.

Below are the five things your organization need to know:

1. Your journey depends on it. When your application owners and lines of business don’t trust that their data is protected, your business suffers. When VMware admins make smaller and fewer VMs, application owners scale back the size of databases and CIOs put off virtualization plans, which can affect other IT initiatives negatively. This constrains business growth—and that’s a losing proposition for you and your organization.

2. It’s all about delivering value. Lines of business can provision a new VM without calling IT—that is, until it comes time to protect it. For this, they have to call the backup team to install the backup client, set the backup groups and policies, configure the networks and assign capacity. Can you say time-consuming? The goal is to reduce the time it takes to do these tasks so IT teams can focus on what’s really important—delivering business value.

3. It’s necessary, but it shouldn’t be difficult. Traditional backup architectures don’t have the performance, flexibility and scale to support today’s data challenges—forget about tomorrow’s; a new approach is needed. However, implementing a new architecture shouldn’t be difficult or come at a high cost. It shouldn’t impose a one-size-fits-all lock on end-users or application owners, or require you to rip and replace anything.

4. It’s a cross-organizational effort.
Transformation is all about delivering what your organization needs when it needs it. To do this, visibility and control of the backup environment and process must be extended to hypervisor, application, storage, converged infrastructure and backup teams. Say good-bye to silos.

5. Choices do matter. Not all backup architectures are created equal; some are inherently smarter. Important considerations include the scale, efficiency and ease of use of the disk back-end, the richness of the backup software and VMware integration. Remember, the architecture you choose should provide lasting value. Be sure to compare.

Got questions? Drop me a note here or on Twitter (@biggarhb) or stop by booth #1207 at VMworld.

Heidi Biggar

Heidi Biggar

Marketing and IT Consultant, Data Protection and Availability Division
I’m often asked how a political science major at Tufts wound up in the IT world, covering backup, storage, virtualization and cloud of all things. Truth is, it’s really a love for learning, a need to understand the “bigger picture” and a desire to share that view with others that’s steered my path over the past 20 years, from campaign manager to editor, analyst and marketer. After hours, you’ll find me hanging with family, running 10ks through Peachtree City’s 90 miles of cart paths, watching football or reading. I’m a New England transplant enjoying life in the South. In my previous life, I also blogged for ComputerWorld, Enterprise Strategy Group and Hitachi Data Systems, but The Backup Window is my baby. It's been great watching it evolve.
Heidi Biggar
This entry was posted in Business/IT Productivity, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , by Heidi Biggar. Bookmark the permalink.

About Heidi Biggar

I’m often asked how a political science major at Tufts wound up in the IT world, covering backup, storage, virtualization and cloud of all things. Truth is, it’s really a love for learning, a need to understand the “bigger picture” and a desire to share that view with others that’s steered my path over the past 20 years, from campaign manager to editor, analyst and marketer. After hours, you’ll find me hanging with family, running 10ks through Peachtree City’s 90 miles of cart paths, watching football or reading. I’m a New England transplant enjoying life in the South. In my previous life, I also blogged for ComputerWorld, Enterprise Strategy Group and Hitachi Data Systems, but The Backup Window is my baby. It's been great watching it evolve.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>