The Second Machine Age: 5 Things Our Kids’ Kids Won’t Know about Healthcare

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  1. A Jawbone used to be a wearable device for geeks.
  2. Walgreens used to be a pharmacy where you went to get your prescriptions.
  3. You could only get a prescription after an in-person visit to the doctor.
  4. To test your blood pressure, you had to wear a rubber sleeve, not just put your socks on.
  5. You went to see a doctor when you felt off color and, strangely, you felt better just sitting in reception waiting while people all around you were coughing.

 

Transportation and retail aren’t the only industries being redefined by technology and our insatiable need to automate pretty much every aspect of our lives. Healthcare is too.

In this third installment of my “what life will look like in the new Industrial Age” series, I’m looking at what‘s in store for us with healthcare.

So, my fascination with healthcare was sparked by a seminar on detoxification and metabolism I attended recently. It seems good health these days is attainable with a discipline of 20% exercise, 30% nutrition and 50% detox. Yes, massive detox followed by much better eating. Continue reading

Guy Churchward

Guy Churchward

President, Data Protection and Availability Division
I'm an enterprise infrastructure hack. Really, if you think of my career as a building, I’ve spent it underneath in the sewer lines and the electric plumbing, making sure things work. Invariably, my businesses end up being called boring. But that’s okay. It means they’re doing exactly what they’re supposed to do, which means their customers can do what they need to do. I come to EMC by way of BEA Systems, NetApp and most recently LogLogic, and my mission is to lead EMC Data Protection and Availability Division's efforts to deliver a protection storage architecture that leaves us all in better shape for the next guy, or gig, that comes along. Oh, and make no mistake about it, I want everyone to know who’s number one in backup, and why.

Mobility and Availability Go Xtrem

Have you recently heard about this new all flash array from EMC? Might have gone past your RSS feeds, your twitter timelines, your blog rolls and your press release markers. Continue reading

Ashish Palekar
I have been around the storage market all throughout my career. It started with learning Fibre Channel and iSCSI from the ground up and contributing to the standards body. My next gig was building processors at Trebia Networks to mediate between converting from FC to iSCSI. From there, I joined EMC. At EMC, I have focused on storage virtualization in various roles – developer, dev manager and product manager. My primary passion these days is helping our customers, partners and engineers understand why the products we are building are game changing. Equally importantly, I am focused on helping us build a business around our products and staying ahead of the market. And that means looking a little beyond the next curve and dreaming about all that can be. And you know what, it is a lot of fun!

Is it a Boom-Box?

boombox

There are lots of amusing videos on YouTube such as singing dogs and cats doing backflips. One of my recent favorites is a video that has kids re-acting to being given a Walkman. Some of the kids thought it was walkie-talkie, another a boom-box, most couldn’t even make a guess.   It is not surprising that kids today don’t recognize these devices and especially the cassettes that are inside. The first Sony Walkman was introduced in Tokyo on July 1, 1979. I still remember getting one for my birthday and talking it to school to impress my friends. This technology wave lasted for over a decade with music cassette sales peaking in 1990, with 442 million being sold that year. In 2010 that number was only 15,000.

As we now know, digital music created a new wave in the electronics industry, allowing 1,000s of songs to be stored on small disk drives in devices like iPods. Today there is a new wave allowing consumers to access millions, even billions of songs online.

I thought of these technology waves when I was Tokyo a few weeks ago for customer meetings.   A number of the organizations I met with were still using tape for data protection, which is not uncommon in many parts of Asia.   While tape has disappeared from pretty much every other part of the electronics industry , it still has a foot hold in IT. Some organizations have been using tape for so long they actually believe there is a legal reason to do so.   It turns out this is not the case; in fact tape is more of a liability in terms of maintaining legal and regulatory compliance.

During one customer meeting, I asked the customer to share the issues they were facing, and also what they considered to be an ideal environment – or their nirvana.   Their first priority was reducing costs, which I wrote on the whiteboard. Then I prompted them for their second priority – which they said was reducing costs. Then to really emphasis the point, the customer told me their third priority was – you guessed it, reducing costs. Of course they had other challenges but reducing costs was top of mind.

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Turns out this customer was using tape, and lots of it.  They were managing 1000s of tapes, and this caused many of their operational problems, and was also the root cause of many of their costs.  Not just the physical media, but also the cost of shipping tapes off site, the cost of managing tape operations and also managing backups separately in each of their branch offices.  Not to mention the costs associated with migrating from one generation of tape to another, and the costs associated with not being able to recover data.   An overview of EMC’s Protection Storage Architecture  really turned the lights on for this customer, and helped them understand how they could not just dramatically reduce their costs, but also help them evolve from being reactive to proactive and offering value added services back to the business units. We also discussed how they could take advantage of the next wave in data protection – cloud centric data management.

I would love to see a YouTube video in 10 years where a StorageTek tape library is shown to Gen Z  IT administrator’s.  I imagine they will respond – “Is it a teleporter”

Reference: Kids React to Walkman

Shane Moore
I have been in the IT industry for close to 20 years and started my career as an Officer in the Australian Air Force. For my first posting, I had a choice to either manage a national network of servers or run a warehouse (the physical kind). Thankfully, I chose the former and subsequently managed infrastructure in a number of public and private organizations. Later, I started selling and then marketing IT solutions for Computer Associates and now EMC. I have a passion for technology and I am excited by the way it continues to transform our lives. In my current role, I work across Asia promoting EMC’s data protection solutions, spending time with analysts and writing articles for traditional and social media. In my spare time, I provide IT support for my family and enjoy the outdoors. For the record, Top Gun is my favorite movie of all time!

On Internet Privacy, Consumers Show “Split Personalities”

EMC Privacy Index, 2014.

EMC Privacy Index, 2014.

We all want to protect our privacy online, but how much – enough to take action? And do the perks that the Internet affords outweigh the risks?

Recent EMC Privacy Index reveals some pretty interesting findings on consumer behavior, and that the conversation around privacy is far from over. Continue reading

Guy Churchward

Guy Churchward

President, Data Protection and Availability Division
I'm an enterprise infrastructure hack. Really, if you think of my career as a building, I’ve spent it underneath in the sewer lines and the electric plumbing, making sure things work. Invariably, my businesses end up being called boring. But that’s okay. It means they’re doing exactly what they’re supposed to do, which means their customers can do what they need to do. I come to EMC by way of BEA Systems, NetApp and most recently LogLogic, and my mission is to lead EMC Data Protection and Availability Division's efforts to deliver a protection storage architecture that leaves us all in better shape for the next guy, or gig, that comes along. Oh, and make no mistake about it, I want everyone to know who’s number one in backup, and why.