The Rise of the “D” in the C-Suite

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Several recent articles have piqued my interest in an emerging addition to the C-Suite – the CDO, or Chief Data Officer. My response is YAA – Yet Another Acronym to add to the stretched recesses of our memory banks.  Continue reading

Lesley MacDonald
Data protection is my new gig, and I’m digging it! Prior to joining EMC’s DPAD marketing team, my past life was focused on elevating the voice of brands, ranging from Unix operating systems to bagged lettuce and a motley collection of cross-industry products and services. Now inspired by EMC’s vision and thought leadership, my blogger persona is salivating at the prospect of the “next big thing,” and the opportunity to watch things unfold through EMC’s market strategy and positioning.

Destination: Born in the Cloud

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Untitled“No one understands the cloud. It’s a [BLEEP] mystery.” —Jason Segel

Perhaps more than a few of us got a kick out of the trailer from one of this summer’s blockbuster movies. In this clip, the cloud is the villain.

If your family is like mine, meaning not that tech savvy, so their only exposure to the cloud is limited to what’s available on their favorite Apple device, then, yes, the cloud may seem as vaporous as its heavenly counterpart.

But if you’re a tech-savvy CEO, CIO, application or data protection administrator, or business line manager, understanding the cloud and its potential value to your business has become critical. In fact, not understanding the cloud won’t be an option moving forward, which will hold true whether you’re in the IT business (like me) or a different industry altogether. We’re all on a journey, and the cloud will play a part in everything we do.

Let me explain.

To read the full post, please go to our sister site Reflections.

Guy Churchward

Guy Churchward

President, Data Protection and Availability Division
I'm an enterprise infrastructure hack. Really, if you think of my career as a building, I’ve spent it underneath in the sewer lines and the electric plumbing, making sure things work. Invariably, my businesses end up being called boring. But that’s okay. It means they’re doing exactly what they’re supposed to do, which means their customers can do what they need to do. I come to EMC by way of BEA Systems, NetApp and most recently LogLogic, and my mission is to lead EMC Data Protection and Availability Division's efforts to deliver a protection storage architecture that leaves us all in better shape for the next guy, or gig, that comes along. Oh, and make no mistake about it, I want everyone to know who’s number one in backup, and why.

Not all (Public) Clouds are Created Equal

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When you talk about data protection, the idea of encryption is going to come up, probably sooner rather than later. There’s a good reason for that. If you want to keep your data safe, it has to be encrypted.  Continue reading

Brian Heckert

Brian Heckert

My first long-term exposure to technology was the typewriter. I still love that invention, which really sparked my interest in writing. For the past 20 years, I have worked in high tech as a content development specialist, marketing writer, and documentation editor. Prior to working in the software industry, I was a journalist, photographer, photo editor, and military fire fighter. After hours, I enjoy spending time with family, reading, and hiking in the mountains.

The Right Ingredients For Staying Ahead of The Bad Guys

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One of the common threads you hear about in major data breaches these days is that the victim’s security team had alerts or events that should have clued them into the fact an attack was underway. In today’s complex security infrastructures it’s not unusual to have security operators/analysts receiving tens of thousands of alerts per day! Security monitoring and incident response need to transition from a basic rules-driven eyes-on-glass SIEM capability to a big data and data science solution. I frequently speak with customers about how IT Security needs to be able to handle a lot more information than current SIEM tools can support, and one question that always comes up is “what information needs to be collected and why?”, so here we go.

To start with you still need to collect all of those alerts and events from your existing security tools. While maintaining eyes-on-glass analysis of each individual alert from every tool isn’t feasible, a security analytics tool can analyze and correlate those events into a group of related activities that can help an analyst understand the potential impact of a sequence of related events instead of having to slice and dice the events manually.

The second type of information is infrastructure context – what’s in the environment, how’s it’s configured, how it’s all related and what is its impact? The analytics system needs to understand what applications are running on what servers connected to which network and what storage. By having access to these relationships the analytics tool can identify the broad-based impact of an attack on a file server by understanding all of the applications that access that file server and weight the alert accordingly. Which brings up another critical point – assets need to be classified based on their potential impact to the organization (aka security classification). If the tool identifies suspicious sequences of activity on both a SharePoint site used to exchange recipes and an Oracle database containing credit card numbers but doesn’t understand the relative value of each impacted asset it can only present both alerts as being of equal impact and let the operator decide which one to handle first. So a consolidated, accurate, up-to-date and classified system of record view your environment is critical.

Events event logs from all of those infrastructure components are the 3rd type of information; not just security events but ‘normal’ activities events as well. This means all possible event logs from operating systems, databases, applications, storage arrays, etc. Given that targeted attacks today can almost always succeed in getting into your infrastructure, these logs can help the analytics tool identify suspicious types of activities that may be occurring inside your infrastructure, even if the events don’t fall into the traditional bucket of security events. Here’s an example – a storage administrator makes an unscheduled snapshot of a LUN containing a database with sensitive data on a storage array, then mounts it on an unsecured server and proceeds to dump the contents of the LUN onto a USB device. The storage array logs show that someone made an unauthorized complete copy of all of your sensitive data, but if you weren’t collecting and analyzing the logs from that storage array you would never know it happened.

The fourth type of information a security analytics tool needs is threat intelligence – what are the bad guys doing in the world outside of your environment. A comprehensive threat intelligence feed into the security analytics tool will allow it to identify attempted communications with known command and control systems or drop sites, new attack tools and techniques, recently identified zero-day vulnerabilities, compromised identities and a host of other information that is potentially relevant. A subscription-based solution is a great solution to this.

The final type of information an analytics tool needs are network packets. Being able to identify a sequence of events that points to an infected server is only the first step – the analyst then needs to determine when the infection occurred and go back and replay the network session that initiated the infection to identify exactly what happened. Think in terms of a crime investigation – with a lot of effort and time the CSIs may be able to partially piece together what occurred based on individual clues, but being able to view a detailed replay of the network activities that led up to the infection is like having a complete video recording of the crime while it happened. Again the goal is to provide the analyst and incident responder with complete information when the alert is raised instead of the having to spend hours manually digging for individual bits.

The volume of information and amount of effort necessary to quickly identify and respond to security incidents in today’s environment is huge, which is why big-data and data science-based tools are absolutely critical to staying ahead of the bad guys.

 

John McDonald
John McDonald is a Senior Architect in EMC's Trust Solutions Group, where he is responsible for developing and communicating trust-based solutions that encompass all of EMC's, RSA's and VMware's products. He has over 30 years of experience in the IT industry in general and IT Security in particular, and has worked extensively as a consultant, developer and evangelist across all industries and virtually all major areas of IT and security technology. He has spoken at dozens of industry and vendor IT and Security events, and has written over 20 whitepapers for EMC and RSA. John is also a CISSP and has held certifications in several other areas, including disaster recovery, Microsoft technology and project management.

IT’s New Dirty Little Secret

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A colleague of mine recently came across an article I wrote when I was doing some consulting work for a data protection company nearly 10 years ago.

While it feels more than a lifetime ago that I wrote that piece, as I read through it, it struck me just how little some things have changed. It’s as if time has stood still… creating a pocket of inertia.

In fact, with only a few product/technology updates, a new title and a July 2014 time stamp, the piece could run today, likely without even an eyebrow raised. Heck, I’d go so far as to wager that if the article were to run, more than a few would chime in on the tape versus disk theme that runs through it.
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Heidi Biggar

Heidi Biggar

Marketing and IT Consultant, Data Protection and Availability Division at EMC Corporation
I’m often asked how a political science major at Tufts wound up in the IT world, covering backup, storage, virtualization and cloud of all things. Truth is, it’s really a love for learning, a need to understand the “bigger picture” and a desire to share that view with others that’s steered my path over the past 20 years, from campaign manager to editor, analyst and marketer. After hours, you’ll find me hanging with family, running 10ks through Peachtree City’s 90 miles of cart paths, watching football or reading. I’m a New England transplant enjoying life in the South. In my previous life, I also blogged for ComputerWorld, Enterprise Strategy Group and Hitachi Data Systems, but The Backup Window is my baby. It's been great watching it evolve.