EMC SourceOne Archiving

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Data Archiving in an Information Age

In today’s world, astronomic amounts of data can be found everywhere. Between the birth of the world and 2003, there was only 5 Exabytes of information created; now we create 5 Exabytes of data every two days. For the majority of the companies, on the one hand, they are facing the challenge of dealing with vast oceans of newly-generated data on a daily basis; on the other hand, they have the responsibilities of managing these data with appropriate methods to deal with compliance requirements and litigation readiness in a cost-effective and efficient way. Continue reading

Jennifer Zhou

Jennifer Zhou

Product Marketing Manager, Core Technologies Division
I tell stories about how awesome EMC SourceOne archiving and Data Protection Search are! Prior to joining EMC in June 2014, I spent 2 years in the MBA program at University of Washington studying finance, marketing and entrepreneurship. I have worked in a few companies including F5 Networks, Microsoft, VMware and Blue Nile. Spare time activities include reading, yoga, hiking and playing with my cat Max. Follow me @JenniferZS1PMM

4P Approach To Protecting Data In The Digital Age

When talking about data protection or the lack of data protection in the corporate environment, I’ve come to the realization; it truly affects everyone across all organizations. Once organizations started realizing they could not function well – if at all without access to critical data, requirements for data protection began to change. Shifts in companies and IT organizations began and new methods for protecting electronically stored information were approached. A colleague recently blogged about The Rise of the “D” in the C-Suite, it talks about the role of Chief Data Officer. This is a great example of how companies are thinking about data differently.  Continue reading

Lisa Matzdorff

Lisa Matzdorff

Voice of Customer, Data Protection and Availability Division
I have a passion for listening, more specifically, listening to customers share their IT stories, their experiences, their successes! Over the past 7 years in the role of customer reference manager and customer advocacy manager, I’ve had the pleasure of listen to amazing stories and meeting some very interesting people. The one thing that makes my job even better…I get to share those stories. When I’m not working, I’m volunteering with foster children, running 5K fun runs, playing fashion consultant “What Not To Wear” style, traveling, and watching reality t.v

Is Your Compliance Just Checking the Box?

459116601If your organization retains data to meet regulatory requirements, then you probably have a strategy to store that data somewhere. But do you have a good strategy to access and return any part of that data that is requested? If not, your compliance might be just “check the box” compliance – and headed for trouble. Continue reading

Jim Shook

Jim Shook

Director, eDiscovery and Compliance Field Practice, Data Protection and Availability Division
I am a long-time “lawyer/technlogist”, having learned assembly language on a TRS-80 at age 12 and later a degree in Computer Science. But the law always fascinated me, and after being a litigator and general counsel for over 10 years, the challenges that technology brought to the law and compliance let me combine my favorite pursuits. I spend my days helping EMC’s customers understand their legal and compliance obligations, and then how to apply technology and best practices to meet them.

How Large Is Your Digital Shadow (Part 2)

In part 1 of this post, I wrote about the “Digital Shadow” and provided some examples of all of the data that is being created about you or on your behalf, in addition to the data that you create.

Here, we’ll walk a few activities in a typical day, and identify some (but definitely not all!) of the digital shadow that’s being created.   On the left side of the table is a listing of activities, with a discussion on the right noting the digital data that’s being left behind.

Wake up, turn on my phone to check for new texts and emails, surf the web for news and read email in my personal email account. The cell phone carrier has a record of my phone contacting the local tower when it is turned on. knows that I logged into my account and has information about my location based upon my IP address (tracked for security and other purposes).   Since I’m logged into email, my email provider keeps track of my searches (I can turn this off).  My ISP (the cell is often on WiFi for data when I’m home) has information about the sites that I visit.  My browser locally records my history, and the sites I visit may be leaving or updating cookies and/or capturing my IP address along with some unique identifiers on their own servers.

 

Later, I start my work day, logging into the corporate VPN and checking and responding to email messages. The VPN system has information about my log-in, and some of my activities are preserved in email including replies and new messages that I create.  The recipients of my email messages also have a copy, and each copy may be replicated many times for email archives and data protection (backups, etc.).  I don’t think my company tracks my location, but it could.

 

One of my emails includes a file sharing link to a folder for content.  I add this link/file to my folder, and make changes to one of the presentations in that shared area. When I add the link, a copy of everything in the shared folder is made on my laptop, and the information about the link is logged by the system.   This process is replicated for all of the accounts where this app is installed (cell phone, tablets, etc.)   As I change and re-save the presentation, everyone sharing the folder receives the update (and this information is logged and distributed as “news” to other sharing the folder).

 

I grab a quick lunch at my favorite sandwich shop, and while waiting I check in on Facebook, make a few posts and re-tweet a message on Twitter The shop tracks my purchase (and thus my location at that time) with my loyalty card.  Facebook and Twitter both have new content from me that they time-stamp and (unless I’ve turned it off) also know and save my location.  My location is tracked by my phone.  As with every purchase I make today using a credit card, data about my purchase is tracked and available to me online; it is also stored and shared within my credit card company as permitted.

 

I finish my blog post and push “publish”. The post is published to one of our company blogs.  This automatically triggers a tweet about the posting from a few company accounts (and I send my own Tweet), which in turn generates additional data through re-tweets.  My tweet may include my location (this can be turned off).  The blog is captured and republished by several “automatic” online news sites looking for compliance stories – so now it exists on their servers, is backed up by them, and sometimes even re-distributed to hundreds or thousands of subscribers as part of a newsletter distributed in email form.

 

I’m flying later today, so I visit the airline’s site to view the status of my upgrade request and check-in.  I rent and download a movie to my tablet for the trip The airline’s systems capture my log-in and my check-in information.   iTunes records my purchase (as does my credit card company) and the movie is downloaded to my tablet for later viewing.

 

A client calls and we talk for a few minutes.  Then I attend a meeting remotely by phone and web conference.  I call my client back with some additional ideas and leave her a voice message. “Metadata” on both sides of the call is recorded by the carriers – start time and number, end time, etc.  I log into the web conference with my browser and use a password, so that system records my IP address, along with everyone else including the owner of the account. The duration of the conference and the time at which individual attendees “drop” the conference is probably saved.  The voice message system now has a log of my call (time, duration, phone number) along with a recording of the actual message, which might be transcribed and sent by email (e.g. Google Voice).

 

On the drive to the airport, I use a social GPS phone app to check traffic The GPS app uses my location so it knows where I am, and is combining that information with thousands of others to update traffic information.   My cellphone carrier is also creating records as it switches cell towers along the way.  The toll pass on my windshield notes the time and my account (i.e. me) as I electronically pay my fare on the highway.  My car has dozens or hundreds of sensors recording information that will be downloaded at a later date when it is serviced.

 

As I park my car at an offsite location, I send a quick text to a friend. My parking service uses a card reader that registers my entrance to the facility. My carrier creates a record of the text I send, as does my friend’s carrier.  The texts are also stored on each phone (and possibly some tablets and other devices if linked to the same account).

 

At the airport, I check my bag and head through security. My airline knows that I’m at the airport and has data about my luggage, too.  Since I’m in the TSA “Pre” line, TSA’s systems know and record my location on check-in.

 

Waiting for my flight, I buy a cup of coffee and take a photo of an item that may make a good gift. My credit card company registers the time, date, location and amount of my purchase.  The photo that I take is stored, and it tags itself with location info using GPS (unless I turn off this feature….), all of which is stored on my phone, which replicates to a cloud and then across other devices.

 

During the flight, I work on a spreadsheet and a presentation. Okay, this didn’t really happen because there’s no room in the cramped plane – but if it did, I now have new documents on my laptop, which will also be replicated and backed up soon.

 

Upon landing, I reclaim my luggage, pick up my car rental and use my GPS app to drive to my hotel. The airline tracks the location of my bag and the time that my flight arrived.  My rental company records the time and location of my rental, and of course the GPS app knows when and where I left the airport, along with the hotel where I stay.  The hotel keeps information about my check-in, and my credit card company knows that I’m there, too.

 

That night I log into the hotel wifi, check some emails and call it a night. The hotel’s wifi system maintains information on my log-in for billing (and possibly security) purposes.  I may have forgotten, but my trusty DVR at home remembers to record a few of my shows, which are stored on the DVR’s drive.

 

 

I intentionally created a very small amount of this data – the blog post, the photo, and some changes (one copy!) to files that I edited, along with some email and a few pieces of social media content.  Yet my activities generated dozens and dozens – if not hundreds – of discrete data chunks, some of which will be preserved for a long duration.

 

All of this data poses interesting questions, most of which have not been clearly answered:  Who owns and controls this data?  How much of it is / should be subject to privacy requirements?  Is this data available for: eDiscovery; compliance; other purposes?  Should I be made aware of the data that’s being created and stored?  Should I have the right to demand that the data is not retained for long, never retained, or never even created?  Would these answers be different if I lived in Europe?  What if I’m a US Citizen traveling there, or vice-versa?

It’s an interesting exercise, try it out yourself – you may be surprised by your results!

 

 

 

Jim Shook

Jim Shook

Director, eDiscovery and Compliance Field Practice, Data Protection and Availability Division
I am a long-time “lawyer/technlogist”, having learned assembly language on a TRS-80 at age 12 and later a degree in Computer Science. But the law always fascinated me, and after being a litigator and general counsel for over 10 years, the challenges that technology brought to the law and compliance let me combine my favorite pursuits. I spend my days helping EMC’s customers understand their legal and compliance obligations, and then how to apply technology and best practices to meet them.

Chicago Was Cold but EMC Forum Was Hot!

Show is Cold Too, just like ChicagoOctober 23rd was very cold in Chicago, almost 20 degrees below normal.  But at the Westin Hotel near O’Hare Airport things were hot with nearly 600 customers attending the EMC Forum Chicago event.  In 2013 there have been 55 different EMC Forum events happening across the country providing information about EMC’s exciting solutions portfolio helping thousands of existing and potential EMC customers better understand how to lead their own transformation.

The event was kicked off by Steve Crowe, the Central Division Senior VP, with the keynote address given by Jon Peirce, SVP, IT Private Cloud Infrastructure Services sharing the different ways that EMC is leveraging its own solutions to transform EMC into a more efficient organization. Following the keynote, there were 5 different tracks including 20 different sessions to choose from on topics that ranged from cloud transformation, backup recovery and archive, converged infrastructure with Vblock, VIPR, to Big Data.  There were also 14 sponsor booths where folks could stop and talk about specific products and solutions. When I was a customer, I loved to attend these events to get the latest information on all things EMC.

I was lucky enough to be the presenter of “Changing the Game with EMC Backup and Recovery” for BRS.   My session was full with even some attendees standing in the back which tells me there are still lots of folks out there struggling with backup and archive. I talked about how IT organizations that don’t focus enough on servicing the needs of their business units can create an accidental architecture which can be very inefficient, expensive, hard to manage, and not be as scalable as it needs to be. I provided an overview on how EMC’s data protection solutions for backup and archive can provide real value for their transformation journey.  I also provided an update on our most recent launch for Data Domain, Avamar, and NetWorker.

I believe there is only 1 EMC Forum event left in 2013 (30 Oct is Dallas, where you can also say “hi
to EMCBackup) – but if you get the chance to attend EMC Forum next year, I highly recommend it.  It was fun and very informative.  In Chicago, EMC Forum was hot, and there was a real buzz in the air!

Gene Maxwell

Gene Maxwell

Technical Marketing, Data Protection and Availability Division
I am known by many as the creator of documentation that helps others easily understand technology. This is because I discovered that I myself was a visual learner as I worked in many different IT roles over the years. Prior to my technical marketing role, I was an EMC technical consultant for six years. I also have many years of experience as a customer in IT responsible for data center management & disaster recovery, including backups. My hobbies include building PCs, collecting movies (Casablanca is my favorite), singing and playing my guitar. I have a twin brother who is three minutes older than I am.